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Malin Head Coastal Walk

malin head coastal walk

Banba’s Crown at Malin Head, Inishowen, Co. Donegal, is the most northerly point of the Irish mainland and is named after Banba was one of the mythical queens of Ireland. At Banba’s Crown you can’t miss the building known locally as the “The Tower” which was built in 1908 by the Admiralty, and later used as a Lloyds Signal Station. Not only is this Ireland’s most northerly point, but an area of great scenic beauty, and of historical, scientific and ecological importance.
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Not surpisingly it is also a perfect starting point for a remarkable ramble along a newly developed coastal walk overlooking the cliffs to Hell’s Hole, a subterranean cavern 250 feet long and 8 feet wide, into which the wild Atlantic ocean crashes in with great force. The walk has plenty of benches sited along the way to take in the breathtaking views. This is well worth a visit. Enjoy this stunning walk and Ireland at its best. Banba Crown, Malin Head, nestled in Inishowen, Co. Donegal.

Caffe Banba at Malin Head

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New Malin Head Tourism Project

New Malin Head Tourism Project – A Malin Head tourism project has been launched which will see development of a cliff top path and a viewing platform at this iconic visitor attraction. In welcoming guests to the launch of the EU funded marine tourism project at Malin Head, television personality Joe Mahon explained that the INTREERG IVA funded project will enhance, protect and promote the unique environment of Ireland’s most northerly point.

Part of the project works will see the building of passing places along the roads leading to the headland. A disabled viewing access area and cliff top trail will allow the visitor to safely enjoy the fabulous views across to Inishtrahull island and the Scottish isles beyond.

  • New Malin head Tourism Project

The aim of the development of facilities at Malin Head is to enhance the visitor experience and increase tourism in the area.

Donegal County Council and Loughs Agency are working together to develop a tourism product that will create many long-term benefits for the local community.

The Malin Head project represents an example of excellent partnership working between Loughs Agency (as lead partner) and Donegal County Council (as project partner). The Loughs Agency plans several other marine tourism and angling development projects funded by a €4 million programme of investment through the European Union’s INTERREG IVA programme, managed by the Special EU Programmes Body.

Speaking at the launch, John Pollock (Acting Chief Executive of the Loughs Agency) highlighted that the Malin Head project presents a fantastic opportunity to enhance the tourism offer at this iconic place. He went on to praise the contribution of local landowners, the wider Malin Head community, Donegal County Council and council staff without whom the project could not have gone ahead. John went on to explain that EU funding has proved an enabler – the finance to match the goodwill of local people, the efforts of council staff and the perseverance of Loughs Agency staff.

Donegal County Council’s Tourism Development Officer commented: “Donegal County Council is delighted to be working with Loughs Agency and the SEUPB in the delivery of this project. The Malin Head project is part of Donegal County Councils ongoing efforts to develop the area as a world-class visitor destination. In addition to the support of the local landowners and Malin Head Community Association, this project is the result of the hard work of the Malin Head Steering Group, chaired by Inishowen Development Partnership”.

It is hoped that the project will complete later this year.

Inishowen Roadtrip

Inishowen Roadtrip – Experience the spectacular scenery along the “Inishowen 100” scenic drive. This road trip takes you from Carndonagh town to Malin Head, Ireland’s most northerly point.
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View holiday homes in Inishowen

 

Empire Heritage Malin Head Donegal

Empire Heritage Malin Head Donegal – Underwater robotics technology has been shedding new light on two shipwrecks off the Donegal coast. “The Northern approaches off the Donegal coast represented a bottleneck for convoys in a major shipping route in the second World War across the North Atlantic,” says Dr Daniel Toal from the Marine Robotics Research Centre at the University of Limerick. “Significant tonnage in shipping was attacked and sunk in this wartime gauntlet and there are a large numbers of wrecks.”

He and his team built the smart robotic system used in the survey, ROV Latis, and technical diver Dr Ger Dooly helped to plan the expedition.

In September, the ROV checked out the wrecks of the S S Empire Heritage, sunk in 1944, which lies 70 metres under the surface and 15 miles north-west of Malin Head, and the passenger liner S S Empress of Britain, sunk in 1940 and now lying at a depth of 160 metres, 40 miles northwest of Bloody Foreland.

Despite the challenging weather conditions and wave heights of up to four metres, the Marine Institute-supported survey gathered camera and sonar images of the SS Empire Heritage site. They showed the cargo of Sherman tanks, which were originally destined to fight in the second Word War but are now scattered across the seafloor, according to Dr Toal. The survey also showed that the SS Empress of Britain lies on her side and is broken along her keel.

The UL team is now focusing on developing underwater robotics technology to support the renewable ocean energy sector.

This article appeared in the Irish Times

Malin Head Nature Photography

A lovely set of photographs inspired by the rich natural diversity at Malin Head, Inishowen, Co. Donegal by Ronan McLaughlin.

Malin Head or Cionn Mhálanna is the most northerly headland of the mainland of Ireland, and the most northerly point is actually a small islet 2 km northeast of Malin Head, known as Dúnaldragh or Fort of the bird flocks, Inishowen Peninsula, County Donegal. It lies at latitude 55.38ºN. Malin Head gives its name to the Malin sea area. There is a famous met station on the head. The oldest coastal radio statio in Europe can be found here, operating since 1902 and is part of the Irish Coastguard,

View Ronan’s Other Photos on Flickr

Ronan’s Photos on Flickr